Mark Tanner
Mark Tanner
15 November 2017 0 Comments

Here’s some further encouraging news for China’s consumer market: in the first eight months of this year more babies were born into families with multiple children than those without – some 52% versus 45% in 2016. That will hearten the folk in Beijing who are seeking solutions to support its top-heavy population demographics, and should be music to the ears of brands peddling everything from infant formula to shared accommodation. During last weekend’s enormous Singles’ Day festival, baby products were among the top-selling categories.

Despite the increases, Chinese mothers continue to have one of the highest workplace participation rates globally, with 63% of females in the workforce versus 56% in the US and 50% globally.  This is the result of a generation of the one-child policy, differing family structures which see grandparents caring for young ones and an admirable cultural belief that “women hold up half the sky.”

Even with the spike in those procreating, many Chinese remain uninformed on the subject.  For example, more than 80% of adults in China have misunderstandings about contraception. This is the result of limited sex education and ‘birds and bees’ chats between parents and their kids. Sexual references are taboo in mainstream media and other channels. It was in 2015 when the big budget empress TV soap was taken off air to have Fanbingbing chest shots photoshopped out. Homosexual references are completely banned and even leggy models were even banned from car shows as Beijing does what it can to keep its population pure and innocent. This is reflected in consumer tastes and confirmed in numerous China Skinny research projects which has found an aversion to certain images deemed too sexy, with distinct preferences for the cutesy.

Yet behind the Hello Kitty knits and gaming youth, sexual innuendos are becoming more commonplace in China. Any visit to the local convenience store is a testament with battery operated devices, lubes and contraceptives taking prime real estate in point of sale displays by the counter. In a movement that represents greater self-confidence towards previously frowned upon areas, lingerie has become one of the fastest-growing fashion categories in China growing 20% annually for almost a decade.

There are much less subtle indicators of a trend towards an increased liberalness. Durex is leading the revolution by tiptoeing around the sensitive subjects to create engaging and timely communications that resonate with consumers online and get shared en masse. And while Durex and other foreign brands lead the category, a host of local condom makers are coming up with new innovative products to break into the fast-growing category.

Like everything in China, what appeals and is acceptable to consumers is constantly shifting. Hit the mark, and a brand can attain a cult-like following. Miss it, and there can be an anti-following. Agencies such as China Skinny can assure you are on the markGo to Page 2 to see this week’s China news and highlights.

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