Mark Tanner

Me is the New We in China

2017/08/30 Mark Tanner
0 Comments
Chinese Valentine’s Day Qixi fell on Monday with the usual barrage of schmaltzy ads and online deals. Yet not everyone was out spending a month’s wages on heart-themed handbags or posting romantic dinner snaps on WeChat.

There are more than 200 million singles in China, with the number of Chinese adults living alone growing 16% since 2012 to reach 77 million. By 2021, they’re set to rise to 92 million according to Euromonitor. China’s much-publicised shortage of 30 million females has been exacerbated by ‘left over’ women in urban areas whose evaluation of Mr. Right has become more rigorous, while careers are increasingly more important and eligible bachelors get distracted with gaming (although girls do find love on Honour of Kings and other games).

China’s singledom trend is being led by higher tier cities: Women in Shanghai average 30 years old when they first marry, up from 27 in 2011. They’re also twice as likely to get divorced than a decade ago. In universities – where many Chinese traditionally meet their spouse – 70% remain single, with 68% of them wishing they weren’t.

For a large share of high-spending urban millennials, Me is the new We. Brands are showing ever-more love to appeal to the valuable single demographic’s functional and emotional needs. The best-known example is Tmall’s Single’s Day but on a smaller scale, there are a host of examples brands can learn from to ensure their products and services are relevant to this lucrative segment.

Hot pot chain Haidilao offers solo diners a choice of large, cuddly soft toys to join them for dinner to help them feel less lonely. Qixi saw legendary snack brand Three Squirrels target China’s “single dogs” by crafting a promotional campaign to let their voices be heard. Japanese chain Muji has introduced smaller rice cookers, ovens and kettles aimed at Chinese singles. Food & beverage brands are increasingly offering single-serve formats for dinner and other meals and the explosive rise of food delivery has been largely driven by singles with 65% of food delivery orders on Meituan-Dianping going to unmarried folk.

Tourism is a segment that stands to benefit from having single-focused offerings for Chinese travellers. Solo travellers are much more likely to prefer sightseeing and experience local culture than groups, and safety is more important than ever. Accommodation and activities that strike a chord with this are likely to experience the greatest growth.

With China’s consumer market now the world’s most contested, brands that take a broad brush approach to appeal to everyone are likely to appeal to few. More targeted marketing to specific segments such as singles is likely to have a greater impact. Agencies such as China Skinny can assist with that.

For our readers in Southern California, the esteemed Ann Bierbower will be sharing valuable China marketing tips and insights at the Export 101 workshop in Los Angeles next Wednesday September 6 organised by the CalAsian Chamber, US Department of Commerce and DHL Express.  For more information and to register, tap/click hereGo to Page 2 to see this week’s China news and highlights.

Go to Page: 1 2

[ch-show-popup]