Mark Tanner
Mark Tanner
9 December 2015 0 Comments

As recently as 2012, most Chinese consumers considered international labels categorically better than local alternatives.  KFC was a good example: although consumers knew deep-fried drumsticks weren’t a super-food, they were from an American company so must be safer, and therefore healthier, than Chinese options that could be cooked in gutter oil, with additives like melamine.  That perception helped fuel more than two new KFC restaurant openings a day in China that year.

Things took a turn in late 2012 when state media accused a KFC supplier of pumping toxic chemicals into chicken.  Subsequent scandals such as meat on the floor and altered expiry dates have shown Chinese consumers that even foreign brands with local supply chains can’t be completely trusted.

This has seen the monumental rise of unadulterated imported food into China.  It’s why Carrefour just opened their biggest supermarket in Asia in Beijing, with a strong focus on imported food.  It’s why the big ecommerce platforms are putting so much effort behind promoting imported food and cross border commerce, and a large reason why Alibaba just opened offices in France and Germany.

Yet, just as Chinese consumers won’t blindly purchase a foreign brand with supply chains in China, they won’t indiscriminately purchase products just because they appear to be imported.   In 2013, a CCTV journalist travelled to New Zealand to find the source of a so-called New Zealand baby formula brand.  The address on the can turned out to be a panel beater’s yard in Auckland whose staff had never heard of the dairy company.  The exposé further fuelled Chinese consumers’ lack of trust and reinforced their need to do extensive research before making a purchase.

In a related event on Single’s Day this year, Weidendorf milk made headlines for selling out of 250,000 cases within 24 hours. The celebrations were short lived when local media and social networks were ablaze with reports that Weidendorf was not a German brand, and unavailable in German shops.  The brand was in fact, owned by a Shanghai company.  It turned out that the local company sourced the raw material, manufactured and packaged in Germany, apparently to EU standards, yet many Chinese consumers were still enraged about being misled and didn’t consider it truly German milk.

With more than 600 million Chinese now armed with a smartphone at all times, it is easy for them to do a background check on a brand, and most do.  There are typically more than ten online and offline touch points on a Chinese consumer’s journey before they make a purchase, so deception doesn’t go unnoticed for long, and will spread like wildfire on social media.  Consumers need more than just a foreign flag or pretty foreign scene on packaging to be convinced of its authenticity.  China Skinny can assist with that.  Go to Page 2 to see this week’s China news and highlights.

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