Mark Tanner
Mark Tanner
28 August 2019 0 Comments

Arriving in China in 2030 may look quite different to how it does today, particularly if the last decade is anything to go by. For a start, expect to see less smokers, more walkers and less oily, salty and sugary food options, if Beijing has its way.

Whilst these things will hopefully happen in most places, they are likely to come about much quicker in China – particularly as a result of the Government’s Healthy China Action Plan for 2019-2030 released last month. The plan detailed 15 campaigns to promote healthy lifestyles and health at various stages of life, and to control major diseases. This included building health knowledge, balanced diets, national fitness, tobacco control, mental health and a healthy environment.

Most of us understand the impact that Government directives have on influencing behaviour and trends in China. They are enacted through Beijing’s powerful levers such as regulations, funding, support and its vast state media networks. They may even impact social credit scores positively or negatively. Private business investments tend to shadow government policies, and in most cases, consumers will inevitably follow.

It would be wise for brands to review the Action Plan’s objectives. The plan provides an indication of some of the issues Beijing will be focusing on over the next decade. One of the wide-reaching initiatives is educating the masses to improve their awareness of healthy living, with health literacy targeted to increase from 22% in 2022 to 30% in 2030. This aims to amend relatively poor health knowledge and unhealthy lifestyles, which include smoking, alcohol abuse, lack of exercise and an unbalanced diet. That is likely to impact the way consumers view products and services, and the marketing around them.

Many of the plan’s goals are on already on-trend, such as healthier eating and increased fitness, however it is likely that these will further accelerate now a strong plan is behind them. For example, the target is for consumers to eat 17% less sugar, 30-40% less oil and 50% less salt in 2030, using 2002 as a base. Whilst there is no new regulation around food processing yet, food and beverage brands should plan for this to be a possibility, and ideally incorporate it into new product development and messaging. The plan also aims to have each consumer eating at least 500 grams of vegetables and fruit daily, something which could be considered when determining ingredients for products.

Another core focus on the health plan is physical activity. The goal is for 40% of people to exercise regularly by 2030, up from 37% in 2022 –  a mere 40 million extra people. That’s suggested to be 6,000-10,000 steps a day, 150 minutes of moderately intense exercise and 75 minutes of high intensity a week. 60% of students should score “good” physical health, up from 50% in 2022. The plan also aims to have the exercising adult populace supported by 7-8 hours sleep. Ultimately as a result, men should have a sub-85cm waistline, and women sub-80cm.

Brands as broad as tourism, fashion, vitamins and health providers should account for an increasingly healthy and health-conscience Chinese consumer. For example, hotel restaurants are likely to be more scrupulously evaluated for healthy food, and tourism operators can count on fitter visitors who are more open to physical activity. Like most things in China, political direction should be considered for any China-related planning, no matter how irrelevant it may seem in your home market. Go to Page 2 to see this week’s China news and highlights.

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